Where Do You Think You Are? A Community Collections Tour of York – Part 2

Last week I posted Part 1 of a series of 3 posts about my ‘Community Collections Tour’ of York. I talked about John Goodricke, the Morrell family, and the Gray family, most well known for their role as prominent solicitors. This week, I’ll be looking at another long-standing family legal firm, and about a York businessman and politician whose name is probably familiar to many York residents, visitors, and anyone interested in the city’s history and the history of the railways.

Munby & Scott:

Just around the corner from the offices of Gray’s Solicitors on Duncombe Place are the old offices of another long-established law firm, Munby and Scott.

The Munby family were solicitors in York from as early as 1665. In 1878, Henry Venn Scott became a partner in the firm. From 1838, their offices were located at No. 18 Blake Street (which was actually No. 3 Blake Street up until the mid-1950s when the street was renumbered). The house in which their offices were located was originally built in 1789 for a member of the Woodhouse family, who were connected to the Munbys by marriage.

No. 18 Blake Street housed the offices of Munby & Scott from 1838 - 2007.

No. 18 Blake Street housed the offices of Munby & Scott from 1838 – 2007.

George Leeman:

The statue of George Leeman stands just outside the city walls as you walk from the station.

Statue of George Leeman, located just outside the walls of the City as you walk from the Station

Statue of George Leeman, located just outside the walls of the City as you walk from the Station

Inscription on the statue of George Leeman.

Inscription on the statue of George Leeman.

Leeman is most well-known for his connection to the railways and his opposition to George Hudson, the ‘Railway King’. In 1849 he was Chairman of York, Newcastle, and Berwick Railway. He promoted mergers which led to the creation of North Eastern Rail (N.E.R.) in 1854, and from 1874 – 1880 he served as Chairman of N.E.R.

However, Leeman was also a successful lawyer and politician. He was Lord Mayor of York three times – 1853-1854, 1860-1861, and 1870-1871. He was also elected as an M.P. for the city in 1865, 1871 and 1874.

As I mentioned last week, these collections will be made gradually available to the public throughout 2015 as we are still busy processing everything.

That’s it for this week. I hope you enjoyed reading a little more about my walk around York. Thank you to everyone who read and/or commented on my post last week. Next week, in the final post in this series, I’ll be talking about one of York’s most well-known artists.

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