NEW art project launched at York Explore

Do you remember at the start of the year we ran ‘What Should York Remember?’ and the Archives Roadshow? We mentioned there could be an art project in the pipeline and that you should wait for details….well your wait is over!

I’m pleased to announce the results of the Roadshow and to launch ‘What York means to us’, a visual representation of York’s past, present and future through the voices of 600 York residents.

We gathered a total of 600 spoken, written and artistic responses from residents aged 3-90 across York. These responses were then presented to local artists who pitched their ideas for a piece of legacy artwork, to tell a very local story of York revealing how the City sees itself.

We chose Emily Harvey to scope, create and install the artwork as a legacy of the York: Gateway to History project. Emily has experience in community arts and one of her most recent projects was the collaborative creation of the banners that hung along the city walls during the Tour De France.

Emily is a printmaker who runs courses as well as leading community art projects

Emily is a printmaker who runs courses as well as leading community art projects

Emily is creating a coloured textured panel made from resin plaster, based on the City Walls with the stones illustrating aspects of York that local people shared with us during the project. The mortar will contain text to link the words and voices of today’s residents to the images in the stones. Emily shared her ideas, and inspiration with us as a taster of what’s to come:

“I am really excited to be starting work on the panel for York Explore Library and Archives. This project brings together a lot of things I am interested in especially community arts, design, architecture, history, and public art.

I started by reading through all the stories about York collected over the last few months, these have inspired a lot of images already which I have been sketching and researching.

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I got some funny looks when I was out taking close up photos of the walls – I must have looked like a very short sighted tourist! I particularly like the ones with accidental faces in them.

Faces in the City Walls discoverd by Emily as part of her research

Faces in the City Walls discoverd by Emily as part of her research

I also have a life size drawing on the wall of the studio to I can collect all the ideas together and get them into a coherent design. I am sure this will change and evolve over time.

The wall in Emily's studio is ready and waiting!

The wall in Emily’s studio is ready and waiting!

In order to get the technique and the measurements right I have done a few test pieces – I find that more ideas come while actually making things so the process is a mixture of planning, doing and thinking and eventually the final piece starts to take shape.”

 

Sample panels and sketches created by Emily as a taster of what’s to come!

Emily has created some mood boards showing how she has been inspired, not only by the responses but also by the City Walls and our archive collections. These are on display on the 1st floor landing at York Explore where the final piece will be installed.

Pop along to York Explore and discover what’s inspiring Emily and where the final art piece will be installed

What York means to us will be launched in November 2015 and be available to everyone to enjoy. If you or anyone you know contributed to this activity, pop along and see if anything you said is featured!

Watch out in The Press over the next couple of weeks for a feature revealing even more about this exciting project!

Coming soon to a library near you…

This year we’re pleased to announce that we’re taking archives and local history out across Explore’s branch libraries in our first ever Archives Roadshow.

We’re thrilled with our new archive service at Explore York but we know that for many of you, the local library is still the heart and soul of your community. That’s why Francesca and I will be touring all branch libraries during 2015, giving you a chance to discover more.

We've had all our publicity professionally designed so you'll know what to look out for in your branch

Seen these leaflets around? It’s all Gateway to History!

Expect to see shiny pop up banners and leaflets advertising the Gateway to History project and the Gateway to Your Archives training workshops; discover how to use the archive catalogue; see copies of items from our community archives; ask us all about the new archive service and share your local history stories with us.

But we’d like you to get involved as well. Throughout 2015 we’re asking you, What should York Remember? We want your thoughts on the people, places, events and memories that have shaped our city and the way we live.

We launched this event at Residents Festival in York Explore on 31st January and we got some facinating responses including ‘The remarkable lives of ordinary people’, ‘the smell of chocolate’ and ‘disability rights in York’. We had some truly inspirational discussions and even some children popped in to draw us a picture of York Minster!

Examples from our activity at Residents Weekend 2015

Examples from our activity at Residents Festival 2015

If you’d like to have your say and learn more, the first 3 dates of the Roadshow are:

Tang Hall Library – 17th February 2015
Clifton Library – 25th February 2015
Acomb Library – 26th February 2015

Expect to see us at each branch library at least twice throughout 2015 and we’ll be advertising more dates throughout the year. Keep a look out for this eye catching poster in your local library to see when we’re next coming to you!

Look out for this poster in your local library!

Look out for this poster in your local library as it will include dates for each branch

From April 2015, you’ll also get a chance to see our popular WW1 pop-up banner exhibition as it tours the branches. Its currently upstairs in the foyer at York Explore Library so if you’re popping in, take a look. Check with your local library over the coming months and discover when its coming to you.

Our WW1 banner exhibition - coming soon to a branch near you!

Our WW1 banner exhibition – currently on the landing at York Explore

We look forward to meeting you all as we travel around the city and discover what York should remember!

The Archives need You! Get involved with the city’s heritage at York Explore

With the dawn of a new year comes the start of our new archive service, which is now up and running at the beautifully refurbished York Explore. If you haven’t already popped in to have a peek at what’s new, then maybe our upcoming events are the perfect excuse to get acquainted!

Residents Weekend is the ideal time to get a flavour of what our archives are and how you can get involved. On Saturday 31st January me and Sarah Tester will be on hand in the shiny new Local History room telling you all about the fantastic community collections we are working on as part of the HLF funded Gateway to History Project. We will be showing off our new online catalogue, which has been made publically available for the first time, and are looking forward to demonstrating how it works and answering your questions. We hope it will inspire you to begin your own journey into our collections!

On the day you will also be able to see some of the types of fascinating documents we have in our collections as well as have the chance to tell us ‘What Should York Remember?’. Your responses will help us to understand what is important about York to local people and make sure we are recording a balanced history of the city for all time. The feedback we gather will also form part of a exciting future project – so don’t miss your chance to make history with us!

If you can’t make it on Saturday then don’t forget that highlights from some of our newly catalogued collections are on our Community Collections Pinterest Board.

Pinterest

As if that wasn’t enough we are also pleased to announce that as part of the Gateway to History project that we are now taking bookings for our Gateway to Your Archives workshops. These are a series of one-day interactive workshops for local groups and organisations (ie. societies, groups, businesses, charities etc.) aimed at giving local people the help they need to create, manage and use their own archives. The workshops include lunch and refreshments and run from 10am-4pm at York Explore on the following dates:

Thursday 12th FebruaryFULLY BOOKED
Saturday 25th April
Thursday 9th July
Thursday 24th September
Saturday 24th October

Extra date added due to popular demand:
Thursday 19th February – LIMITED SPACES

Gateway to Your Archives Workshop Leaflet

Click here to see our Gateway to Your Archives workshop leaflet

Places are filling up fast so please book soon to avoid disappointment! You can do this by popping into your local library or by emailing sarah.tester@exploreyork.org.uk. If you need any more information or have a large group that cannot make any of the dates, please get in touch.

On top of that, we are also running a special one-off Gateway to Your Archives: Social Media and the Digital Environment workshop on the 19th March. If you think a representative from your organisation would like to attend, then please contact us for more details as spaces are limited.

Phew! We hope that you can join us at these events and more throughout the year, so make sure you stay tuned to our blog, Twitter and Facebook for all the latest updates.

See you there!

Where Do You Think You Are? A Community Collections Tour of York – Part 3

This is the final part of my series of three posts about my ‘Community Collections Tour of York’.

So far I’ve talked about families and individuals from York who, in various ways, played an important role in the life of the city.

This week’s post focuses on one of York’s most well-known historical figures, a famous artist, whose statue stands in Exhibition Square in front of the Art Gallery – William Etty, R.A.

Many residents of and visitors to York will be familiar with this statue of artist William Etty which stands outside the Art Gallery in Exhibition Square.

Many residents of and visitors to York will be familiar with this statue of artist William Etty which stands outside the Art Gallery in Exhibition Square.

Etty was born on 10th March 1787 at 20 Feasegate. This is commemorated on a plaque on the site where the house once stood, now occupied by modern businesses.

This plaque marks the site of the house on Feasegate where William Etty was born. It is located on the wall between the rear entrance of BHS and Viewpoint Opticians.

This plaque marks the site of the house on Feasegate where William Etty was born. It is located on the wall between the rear entrance of BHS and Viewpoint Opticians.

Etty spent much of his life in London, but he established the York School of Design (later the York School of Art) in 1842. After his retirement in 1848, he returned to York and lived in a house on Coney Street.

He died in York in 1849, and was buried in St Olave’s churchyard.

One of the collections I’m working with is another plaque, this one a memorial stone from Etty’s tomb, which was discovered in the garden of St William’s College by a builder.

St William’s College. A memorial plaque to William Etty was discovered in the garden by a builder.

St William’s College. A memorial plaque to William Etty was discovered in the garden by a builder.

As I mentioned in my earlier posts, our Community Collections will be made gradually available to the public throughout 2015. At the moment we are still working on checking and processing them.

I really enjoyed my tour of York, tracing locations connected to some of the collections I’m working with. There are many other locations – most are now simply residential houses or businesses – around the city centre which link to other families, individuals, and businesses  that created the records which now form our Community Collections. I hope this whistle-stop tour of some of them has given you a flavour of our Community Collections Archives.

Where Do You Think You Are? A Community Collections Tour of York – Part 2

Last week I posted Part 1 of a series of 3 posts about my ‘Community Collections Tour’ of York. I talked about John Goodricke, the Morrell family, and the Gray family, most well known for their role as prominent solicitors. This week, I’ll be looking at another long-standing family legal firm, and about a York businessman and politician whose name is probably familiar to many York residents, visitors, and anyone interested in the city’s history and the history of the railways.

Munby & Scott:

Just around the corner from the offices of Gray’s Solicitors on Duncombe Place are the old offices of another long-established law firm, Munby and Scott.

The Munby family were solicitors in York from as early as 1665. In 1878, Henry Venn Scott became a partner in the firm. From 1838, their offices were located at No. 18 Blake Street (which was actually No. 3 Blake Street up until the mid-1950s when the street was renumbered). The house in which their offices were located was originally built in 1789 for a member of the Woodhouse family, who were connected to the Munbys by marriage.

No. 18 Blake Street housed the offices of Munby & Scott from 1838 - 2007.

No. 18 Blake Street housed the offices of Munby & Scott from 1838 – 2007.

George Leeman:

The statue of George Leeman stands just outside the city walls as you walk from the station.

Statue of George Leeman, located just outside the walls of the City as you walk from the Station

Statue of George Leeman, located just outside the walls of the City as you walk from the Station

Inscription on the statue of George Leeman.

Inscription on the statue of George Leeman.

Leeman is most well-known for his connection to the railways and his opposition to George Hudson, the ‘Railway King’. In 1849 he was Chairman of York, Newcastle, and Berwick Railway. He promoted mergers which led to the creation of North Eastern Rail (N.E.R.) in 1854, and from 1874 – 1880 he served as Chairman of N.E.R.

However, Leeman was also a successful lawyer and politician. He was Lord Mayor of York three times – 1853-1854, 1860-1861, and 1870-1871. He was also elected as an M.P. for the city in 1865, 1871 and 1874.

As I mentioned last week, these collections will be made gradually available to the public throughout 2015 as we are still busy processing everything.

That’s it for this week. I hope you enjoyed reading a little more about my walk around York. Thank you to everyone who read and/or commented on my post last week. Next week, in the final post in this series, I’ll be talking about one of York’s most well-known artists.

Where Do You Think You Are? A Community Collections Tour of York Part 1

Hello, I’m Georgie. I’m a Reading and Learning Advisor, usually based at York Explore Library. Since August, I’ve been seconded to our Archives & Local History department working on the Community Collections Project, alongside Sarah Tester and Francesca Taylor.

Community collections consist of non-civic records belonging to individuals, families, businesses and community groups. I was assigned 40 collections of Family and Personal Papers to research and begin to list on CALM, which is the archives management system we use.

I’ve come across some really fascinating stories in the past three months. I was familiar with some of the names – such as the Morrell family and William Etty, but others were new to me. Many of the people who created these collections (which include letters, personal financial records, and diaries) were not particularly famous, but the papers they left behind offer a fascinating insight into not only their personal, family, and professional lives, but also into life in York and Yorkshire from the sixteenth to the twentieth century.

While walking in York one day, I spotted a plaque near Treasurer’s House, commemorating York astronomer, John Goodricke.

Plaque commemorating John Goodricke, near Treasurer's House

Plaque commemorating John Goodricke, near Treasurer’s House

This spawned the idea to look around York for other plaques, statues, and buildings connected with the people behind the collections I’m working on. I did a little research online, and then spent the afternoon of Tuesday 7th October walking around the city, locating sites connected with the people behind some of our Community Collections.

I have divided my tour into three segments which I will share on this blog over the next few weeks.

This week’s post focuses on two York families whose legacy can still be seen around the city today.

The Morrell Family:

One of the collections I’m working on  consists of the personal and household accounts of the Morrell family of York. These papers mostly relate to Robert Morrell and his wife Anna Morrell (nee Wilson). Robert and Anna had a son, William Wilberforce Morrell, who married Lydia Hutchinson in 1869 and had two sons – Cuthbert, born in 1872 and John Bowes, born in 1873.

Cuthbert and John were co-founders of the York Conservation Trust which still cares for several of York’s oldest buildings. John played a key role in the movement to establish a university in York, and the ‘JBM’ Library at York University is named after him. He also served as Lord Mayor of York. He became Director of Rowntrees when he was only 25 years old.

Apart from the JBM Library, there are two other locations in York commemorating the Morrell brothers and their importance to the city.

One is this beautiful timber-framed 14th century house located at the bottom of Walmgate, the Bowes Morrell House.

Plaque from Bowes Morrell House

Plaque from Bowes Morrell House

 Bowes Morrell House, 111 Walmgate

Bowes Morrell House, 111 Walmgate

 

There is also the Cuthbert Morrell House, at 47 Aldwark, which was formerly part of the Blue Coat School

Plaque outside Cuthbert Morrell House, 47 Aldwark.

Plaque outside Cuthbert Morrell House, 47 Aldwark.

The Gray Family:

Another family whose name is still recognized in York today is the Gray family, who were solicitors in York from at least 1695. Several of the collections I’m working on relate to either Gray’s Solicitors or to the family’s personal life. William Gray was born in Hull in 1751. In 1777 he married Faith Hopwood. In 1788, he bought the property that became known as ‘Gray’s Court’, near Treasurer’s House. The Gray family lived there until 1945. Today, it is a luxury hotel, located between Chapter House Street and Ogleforth:

Gray;s Court Hotel, formerly the residence of the Gray family (1788-1945)

Gray’s Court Hotel, formerly the residence of the Gray family (1788-1945)

Gray's Court

Gray’s Court

William became a solicitor, and was a partner in the firm of Graves & Gray. By 1843, the firm had become simply ‘Gray’s Solicitors’ and successive generations of the family were partners. The firm was later joined by partners William Henry Cobb and Ernest Ralph Dodsworth.

In 1897, Gray’s  moved  from their offices at 75 Low Petergate to Duncombe Place.

Gray's Solicitors. The firm moved to this premises on Duncombe Place in 1897.

Gray’s Solicitors. The firm moved to this premises on Duncombe Place in 1897.

These collections won’t be available when we open in January as there is  still need to do some processing work we need to do. We can’t get started on this until we have the new archive open, but we’ll be gradually making collections available throughout 2015 and will let you all know as soon as they are ready.

Next week, I’ll share some images relating to another well-established York legal firm, and to one of York’s most influential businessmen and politicians.

The new series of Mint Yard lectures is finally announced!

I realise I’ve been a bit quiet on the blog recently, but don’t worry – I’ve been working away behind the scenes. Over the last few weeks I’ve been spending a lot of my time pulling together the new autumn programme for the Mint Yard Lectures. The lectures offer members of the public the opportunity to learn more about the history of Yorkshire from nationally-recognised experts, and form part of our contribution to the council’s Inspire programme.

Mint Yard map

The lectures are named after the old Mint Yard, which stood on the land now occupied by York Explore.

There has been a lot to do – I’ve had to track down speakers, write the content for a leaflet and poster and have them designed, write a press release and put together the content for the council’s Inspire website (as well as writing this blog!). I’ve also had to work out the logistics of how to get the right numbers of chairs, tea and coffee to the right places in time, so it’s been all go!

 

Mint Yard lecture leaflets and posters

The new Mint Yard lecture leaflets and posters arrive on my desk.

I’m pleased to say that my hard work has just about paid off, and tickets for the new series of lectures are now on sale from Explore libraries. The first lecture takes place at Haxby Explore Library next Wednesday (3rd September) and will be by Professor Mark Ormrod from the University of York, so book now to avoid disappointment! Mark’s lecture is entitled Immigrant Communities in medieval Yorkshire, and in it he’ll consider attitudes towards the many thousands of people from continental Europe who made their lives and livelihoods in Yorkshire during the period of the Hundred Years War and the Wars of the Roses. It sounds a brilliant subject so I’m really pleased that he has agreed to kick-start the new autumn programme.

On 9 October the series moves to Dunnington Reading Rooms, which will play host to an examination of the Battle of Stamford Bridge in 1066, the final victory of Harold Godwinson, last Anglo-Saxon king of England. The speaker, Chris Rock, is co-founder and current Chairman of the Battle of Stamford Bridge Society and will discuss the reasons for the battle, its course, consequences and its wider role in history. Chris has previously spoken at Acomb Library, so I’m really happy he’s agreed to present another lecture for us.

Battle of Stamford Bridge poster

Chris Rock of the Battle of Stamford Bridge Society will lecture on the battle in October

In November it’s time to get on your bike with Jim McGurn, Chief Executive of Get Cycling, as he discusses the history and future of the bicycle. We know cycling is practical, sociable, egalitarian, ecological, healthy and fun, but why is it also so divisive? Join Jim at Rowntree Park Reading Cafe on 6 November to find out what the bicycle is: technically, intellectually and socially.

The final lecture for 2014 will be Esther Graham’s Remember Scarborough, which will be held at Acomb Explore on 3 December. As the centenary of the 1914 attack on Scarborough by the German navy approaches, Esther, who is Project Officer for Scarborough Museums Trust’s Remember Scarborough project, will discuss the impact of the bombardment on the town and the Museum Trust’s commemoration of the event.

Whilst it has been a lot of work pulling everything together for the programme, I’m happy we have a good range of subjects on offer and four fantastic speakers. All lectures start at 7pm and tickets are £5 each (including tea and coffee) so why not pop down to your local library and get yours now? Alternatively you will shortly also be able to purchase them through the Inspire website (www.feelinginspired.co.uk). I’m looking forward to seeing you there!