Farewell from your Community Collections & Outreach Archivist

The time has come to reflect and officially bring to a close the York: Gateway to History project. It has been an incredible two years and we at Explore have come together as one Library and Archive service.

My role on the project is also coming to an end this week and I can’t believe how far we have travelled since that first week. So here is my personal journey on the project. Enjoy!Sarah with HLF project plan

January 2014 – The activity plan strand of the project gets underway when I started as Community Collections & Outreach Archivist. I was daunted by the challenge but excited to get started!

February 2014 – We got straight in and worked with Lord Deramore’s Primary School in Heslington to unlock the history of the school and discover it’s place in the local community. We worked with three fantastic volunteers who wrote a whopping 17,000 word resource and presented it to the school.

Our three experienced and dedicated volunteers hard at work at the school. From left, Alan Bollington, Phil Batman and Roger Barham

June 2014 – By now I’m travelling all over the city by bus, car and on foot to meet all kinds of different community groups. By the end of 2015 we had created a network of 170 individuals from 78 different community groups. You can see where I went during the project on this handy map!

We also started working with the York Normandy Veterans Association on a project to record their memories and preserve their archives for future generations. In 2015 we hosted a celebration evening for the Veterans and created a special short film about the project.

July 2014 – To help manage over 400 community archives and to support outreach activities in 2015, Georgie and Francesca came onboard as Community Collection Assistants!

CCA staff

October 2014 – We launched the Poppleton History Society archive in Poppleton Library with an event to showcase the collection and network with members of the local community.

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November 2014 – To support First World War commemorations we worked with York’s Alternative History Society to launch our pop-up banner exhibition. The banners went on display at York City Screen Cinema before being toured across all our libraries during 2015.

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January 2015 – We opened our brand new Archives & Local History service at York Explore! During 2015 we welcomed a grand total of 94,858 visitors to the service who came to look at archives, browse our local history books and research their family histories.

Archive Reading Room

February 2015 – We hosted the first of our Gateway to Your Archives workshops. In total 98 representatives from 52 different community groups attended a workshop in 2015 and 98% said they felt more supported by Explore as a result.

One of the Gateway to your Archives workshops.

One of the Gateway to your Archives workshops in progress!

If you are interested in learning about how to manage your community archive, all new resources will be launched onto the Explore website next month. Included in this will be our new training films, on YouTube now!

March 2015 – Alongside the Workshops came the Archives Roadshow. We toured all 17 of Explore’s libraries and asked people ‘What Should York Remember?’.

A grandmother, daughter and grandchildren share York memories with Explore staff and volunteers and Tang Hall Library

We gathered 600 responses to the question and even created a vox-pop short film featuring local peoples thoughts!

May 2015 – We said goodbye to Francesca and hello to Jenny as Community Collections Assistant. Jenny took over responsibility for cataloguing and supporting our outreach activities.

 

June 2015 – To help us catalogue our community archives we set up a Community Collections volunteer project. We got 8 volunteers in total who worked to catalogue 5 large collections adding up to 99 boxes, 203 volumes and 32 rolls!

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The volunteers also worked to create content for the Voices of the Archives booklet and pop-up banner exhibition. They provided quotes and unique insights into our community collections along with our community partners and researchers.

combined booklet and banner image

Group with cake_1August 2015 – We worked with York Learning throughout the project to help adult learners explore the archives and use them as a starting point for art and creative writing. Learners on an art project explored the local history of Acomb to create a piece of public art in Lidgett Grove Church and we were invited along to the launch. A local resident even made a special cake!

September 2015 – We commissioned artist Emily Harvey to interpret the 600 responses from our ‘What Should York Remember?’ activity. She created York Panorama: What York Means to Us which is a tactile representation of how York’s residents and visitors view the history and culture of the City.

Emily busy creating the panels in her studio!

It’s a permanent legacy to the project and is available on the 1st floor at York Explore Library and Archive!

...and watching people enjoy the artwork at York Explore!

November 2015 – We finished off the project by hosting a celebration event at York Explore. City Archivist Victoria Hoyle and HLF Board Member Sue Mendus gave inspirational talks to our community partners and we all shared a drink to celebrate our success!

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So here we are in March 2016 and we have completed our evaluation report and submitted it to the Heritage Lottery Fund. It was a chance to reflect on everything we have done and think about the future.

Sarah in her final week at Explore with the completed evaluation report

Sarah in her final week at Explore with the completed evaluation report

All that is left to say is thank you to everyone that has come on this journey with us! It has been incredible and we couldn’t have done any of this without your support and dedication. We at Explore have an exciting future with new projects, partnerships and catalogued collections. You can take a look at our ambitious plans in our Access Plan. If you have any questions or comments about the project please do get in touch at archives@exploreyork.org.uk

The archives team at the end-of Gateway to History project celebration event

NEW art project launched at York Explore

Do you remember at the start of the year we ran ‘What Should York Remember?’ and the Archives Roadshow? We mentioned there could be an art project in the pipeline and that you should wait for details….well your wait is over!

I’m pleased to announce the results of the Roadshow and to launch ‘What York means to us’, a visual representation of York’s past, present and future through the voices of 600 York residents.

We gathered a total of 600 spoken, written and artistic responses from residents aged 3-90 across York. These responses were then presented to local artists who pitched their ideas for a piece of legacy artwork, to tell a very local story of York revealing how the City sees itself.

We chose Emily Harvey to scope, create and install the artwork as a legacy of the York: Gateway to History project. Emily has experience in community arts and one of her most recent projects was the collaborative creation of the banners that hung along the city walls during the Tour De France.

Emily is a printmaker who runs courses as well as leading community art projects

Emily is a printmaker who runs courses as well as leading community art projects

Emily is creating a coloured textured panel made from resin plaster, based on the City Walls with the stones illustrating aspects of York that local people shared with us during the project. The mortar will contain text to link the words and voices of today’s residents to the images in the stones. Emily shared her ideas, and inspiration with us as a taster of what’s to come:

“I am really excited to be starting work on the panel for York Explore Library and Archives. This project brings together a lot of things I am interested in especially community arts, design, architecture, history, and public art.

I started by reading through all the stories about York collected over the last few months, these have inspired a lot of images already which I have been sketching and researching.

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I got some funny looks when I was out taking close up photos of the walls – I must have looked like a very short sighted tourist! I particularly like the ones with accidental faces in them.

Faces in the City Walls discoverd by Emily as part of her research

Faces in the City Walls discoverd by Emily as part of her research

I also have a life size drawing on the wall of the studio to I can collect all the ideas together and get them into a coherent design. I am sure this will change and evolve over time.

The wall in Emily's studio is ready and waiting!

The wall in Emily’s studio is ready and waiting!

In order to get the technique and the measurements right I have done a few test pieces – I find that more ideas come while actually making things so the process is a mixture of planning, doing and thinking and eventually the final piece starts to take shape.”

 

Sample panels and sketches created by Emily as a taster of what’s to come!

Emily has created some mood boards showing how she has been inspired, not only by the responses but also by the City Walls and our archive collections. These are on display on the 1st floor landing at York Explore where the final piece will be installed.

Pop along to York Explore and discover what’s inspiring Emily and where the final art piece will be installed

What York means to us will be launched in November 2015 and be available to everyone to enjoy. If you or anyone you know contributed to this activity, pop along and see if anything you said is featured!

Watch out in The Press over the next couple of weeks for a feature revealing even more about this exciting project!

Hello there! Introducing Explore’s Newbie…

Hello there! I am Jenny McGarvey, the latest newbie here at York Explore (when I say “newbie”, that’s not technically correct. You might recognise me from my previous blog post, “Getting to Grips with Criminal Histories…”, posted back in March when I was a placement student here, but I am delighted to be back as a member of staff!).

Cataloguing at the end of my first week as Community Collections Assistant

Cataloguing at the end of my first week as Community Collections Assistant

I am the new Community Collections Assistant and I am very excited to be working on the fabulous York: Gateway to History project. My role is to work with Sarah to help her deliver different aspects of the project; from winding up the Archives Roadshow and cataloguing the collections though to helping deliver the Gateway to your Archives workshops and our Community Collections volunteering programme.

 

Some of our volunteers working hard cataloguing some of the community collections.

Some of our volunteers working hard cataloguing some of the community collections.

One aspect of the project that I am very excited about is the creation of an art installation that will reflect the different views of the local community on the question “What should York remember?”. This is the question that has been put to you, the general public, during our Archives Roadshow sessions that have taken place across all of York’s local libraries over the past few months. A local artist will be using your responses to create an installation that will be displayed in the first floor landing at York Explore.

I went along to my first Archives Roadshow session on Monday afternoon at Strensall library, which made for a very interesting first day! We also went along to Dunnington Library yesterday evening for our final stop in the Archives Roadshow journey. It was clear that local history is a popular passion in both Dunnington and Strensall, and it was lots of fun chatting to local residents about the things that they think are important to York’s past. I cannot wait to see the final outcome of the art piece, and how it reflects the huge range of responses we have had about what we should remember about York’s history.

 

“What should York remember?” - some responses given at Strensall library Archives Roadshow.

“What should York remember?” – some responses given at Strensall library Archives Roadshow.

I am also very much looking forward to being involved in the Gateway to your Archives workshops, where we will be encouraging local community groups to develop and manage their own archives. The workshops have been a fantastic success so far and they are an amazing opportunity for us to meet lots of local community group members and help them enhance their archival skills.

 

One of the Gateway to your Archives workshops.

One of the Gateway to your Archives workshops.

Today I have been busy doing my first bit of cataloguing which I am thoroughly enjoying. It has given me the opportunity to have a quick nosey at some very interesting documents and learn how to actually organise a collection logically. I am getting to know the catalogue system and finding it easier each time I log a new entry! I can tell already that I am really going to enjoy this aspect of my job.

You’ll certainly hear a lot more from me over the next few months on our outreach and cataloguing work as part of the Gateway to History project here at York Explore, as I’ll be keeping you updated on our latest events and progress through the blog as well as Twitter, Pinterest and Flickr.

Coming soon to a library near you…

This year we’re pleased to announce that we’re taking archives and local history out across Explore’s branch libraries in our first ever Archives Roadshow.

We’re thrilled with our new archive service at Explore York but we know that for many of you, the local library is still the heart and soul of your community. That’s why Francesca and I will be touring all branch libraries during 2015, giving you a chance to discover more.

We've had all our publicity professionally designed so you'll know what to look out for in your branch

Seen these leaflets around? It’s all Gateway to History!

Expect to see shiny pop up banners and leaflets advertising the Gateway to History project and the Gateway to Your Archives training workshops; discover how to use the archive catalogue; see copies of items from our community archives; ask us all about the new archive service and share your local history stories with us.

But we’d like you to get involved as well. Throughout 2015 we’re asking you, What should York Remember? We want your thoughts on the people, places, events and memories that have shaped our city and the way we live.

We launched this event at Residents Festival in York Explore on 31st January and we got some facinating responses including ‘The remarkable lives of ordinary people’, ‘the smell of chocolate’ and ‘disability rights in York’. We had some truly inspirational discussions and even some children popped in to draw us a picture of York Minster!

Examples from our activity at Residents Weekend 2015

Examples from our activity at Residents Festival 2015

If you’d like to have your say and learn more, the first 3 dates of the Roadshow are:

Tang Hall Library – 17th February 2015
Clifton Library – 25th February 2015
Acomb Library – 26th February 2015

Expect to see us at each branch library at least twice throughout 2015 and we’ll be advertising more dates throughout the year. Keep a look out for this eye catching poster in your local library to see when we’re next coming to you!

Look out for this poster in your local library!

Look out for this poster in your local library as it will include dates for each branch

From April 2015, you’ll also get a chance to see our popular WW1 pop-up banner exhibition as it tours the branches. Its currently upstairs in the foyer at York Explore Library so if you’re popping in, take a look. Check with your local library over the coming months and discover when its coming to you.

Our WW1 banner exhibition - coming soon to a branch near you!

Our WW1 banner exhibition – currently on the landing at York Explore

We look forward to meeting you all as we travel around the city and discover what York should remember!

The Community archive collections are coming!

January 5th is fast approaching and the whole team is busy preparing York Explore for opening. Right now a team of library and archive staff are hard at work stocking the shelves and preparing archive collections.

Preparing the archives has been a process that Francesca, Georgie and I have been working on since August and we were all so excited when we got a huge scale delivery from Deepstore two weeks ago. It was the first time since I started my job back in January that I had actually seen the community collections I manage.

The archives arrived from Deepstore, who are based in the salt mines in Cheshire

The archives arriving from Deepstore from the salt mines in Cheshire where the archives have been kept safely while we built our strongroom.

We had around 300 boxes delivered, most of which were Civic records to be processed by Justine but it also included some previously inaccessible community collections. We haven’t had everything sent back as we are doing this gradually to make sure that the collections we make accessible are catalogued and properly packaged.

The first of the community collections safely on shelves in the strongroom

The first of the community collections safely on shelves in the strongroom

Due to the hard work, and a real team effort, we’re pleased to announce that so far we have 15 community collections ready for researchers to use when our doors open.  Justine is hard at work making sections of the Civic archive ready, which will form the bulk of the archives ready for use.

Here’s a taster of what community collections you’ll be able to discover:

  • The York Art Society
  • York Rugby League Club
  • York Musical Theatre Society
  • Boy Scouts Association York
  • York Educational Settlement
  • Cundall Family Papers and Photographs
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The Boy Scouts collection is full of exciting finds including loads of troop photographs and log books!

All of the collections we have available will be searchable via the Library catalogue and we’re currently working on a programme of work which will allow us to continue making collections accessible gradually throughout 2015. We’re creating a Pinterest board to showcase these collections, similar to the one we have for our First World War material. We’ll also be sharing collection updates via our website and here on the blog.

Finally, I just wanted to say a huge thanks to Georgie who is a Reading and Learning Advisor at York Explore. She came across to this project on secondment to gain archive experience and she has been responsible for half of the collections we’re making accessible in January. You’ll probably see Georgie around the library as she is returning to her previous role and will be working in all areas of the library and archive service.

Georgie, complete with high viz working on one of our collections

Georgie complete with high viz working on one of our collections

Francesca has been responsibe for the other half of the collections and you’ll also see her and myself around as she’ll be working with me throughout 2015 to deliver outreach activities. I’ll be blogging shortly with more details about what you can expect to see from the Gateway to History project next year.

We’ll see you in January!

A Library Girl in the Archives

Hello, I’m Georgie. This is my third week of a three month secondment to the York: Gateway to History Project as a Community Collections Assistant. I’ll be working alongside Francesca  and Sarah to research and catalogue our community collections archives and explore how these can be used in future projects to engage local communities with our Archives.

At the end of my first week!

At the end of my first week!

Community collections are the records of groups, organizations, families and individuals who played a role in the city’s past. The project also involves engaging with a wide range of current community groups to help them make decisions about how to preserve their own archives for future generations.

I have actually worked for Explore York Libraries and Archives for ten years, as a Reading and Learning Advisor. I worked at our central branch on Museum Street up until it closed for refurbishment in June 2014. After that I was based at our Acomb branch, and although I enjoyed working there, I missed my daily contact with our Archives and Local History department. I was very excited to be offered the opportunity to be seconded to the Gateway to History project, and to get the chance to work in an archives environment.

I’ve spent the last couple of weeks researching some of our community archives, particularly focusing on those of families and individuals. I have come across some fascinating and quirky records and I hope to share some of these in future blog posts.

Join us – Education and Public Programmes Officer

I’m thrilled to announce that we’re now recruiting for another new post as part of the ALH team, Education and Public Programmes Officer.

The post is for 1 year (part time) and we’re looking for a creative, innovative person to develop and deliver our learning programme for primary and secondary schools, and families.

I’m already doing a lot of work with communities right across York as Community Collections & Outreach Archivist but until now we’ve set aside schools and family learning for someone with the right skills and experience to deliver activities to these groups. This post will complete the team for the Gateway to History project and continue to build on the community engagement success we’ve already had.

We’re looking for someone with knowledge of the National Curriculum to design education resources for Key Stages 3-5 that engage students with York’s archives and local history. Our vision is that the post holder will design a range of on-site experiences for schools at our Explore centres and libraries, as well as events that raise the profile of archives amongst teachers. This role is all about relationship building across the city with local education providers and learning specialists, to form the basis of a sustainable offer that continues after the end of the Gateway project. By working with Explore staff we are also looking to deliver a programme of informal family events that make archives engaging and fun.

In addition to an enthusiasm for engaging children and young people with the past, we’re looking for someone with an excellent knowledge of British History and the national curriculum as well as a graduate teaching qualification or relevant postgraduate degree, e.g. Archives, Museums, Public History, History. This post would suit someone with experience of using historical sources or archives in a teaching environment.

Interested? You can find out more by downloading the application pack from www.exploreyork.org.uk by navigating to the ‘Us’ section or following the link to Current Vacancies at the top of the page. If you are unable to access the website please contact jobs@exploreyork.org.uk or call 01904 554247 (8.00am – 4.00pm, Mon – Fri) to request an application pack quoting the job title.

The closing date for applications is Monday 25th August at 12 noon.  Interviews will take place in York on Monday 8th September.

This post is funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund as part of the £1.6m York: Gateway to History project.