Bye Everyone!

The time has come for me to leave Explore so I thought I’d share a few of my favourite memories with you from the last 7 months. And what an incredible 7 months it’s been! I feel very privileged to have had the chance to work on the York: Gateway to History project- I’ve met so many wonderful people, from community groups and volunteers to researchers and colleagues.

I really feel like the project has had an invaluable impact both in terms of vastly enhancing the way the archives are stored and in terms of community engagement- and to have played a part in it has been brilliant. But enough of the soppy stuff- here are some of my personal highlights…

  1. Working with the community collections volunteers

Working with the 8 regular Thursday volunteers has been an absolute treat. We were lucky enough to get a wonderful mix of volunteers that all worked really well as a team. In total, they catalogued 5 large archive collections over a period of 6 months (wait for it- that’s 99 boxes, 203 volumes and 32 rolls in total!). They really were fantastic.

2. Watching the ‘York Panorama: What York Means To Us’ art installation come together

As an art-lover this had to have a place in my favourite memories didn’t it?! Since I started at Explore, I have watched the art installation slowly take shape- from the initial concept into a physical installation on the first floor landing at York Explore. It has been incredible to see how the brilliant Emily Harvey took people’s personal memories of York and turned them into a vibrant panorama that accurately depicts how York residents see their city.

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3. Normandy Veterans ‘film premiere’

Explore has done a lot of work with the York Normandy Veterans Association to help them create their own archive (NVA) through the York: Gateway to History project. Most of the work on the Veterans project had already been done by the time I arrived at Explore back in June, but I did some transcriptions from oral history interviews with the veterans and learned a lot about them (and just how inspirational- yet astonishingly modest- they are!). In December, we created a short film telling the story of the Veterans and their archive.

20160126_103618We invited the Veterans to Explore to have their very own ‘film premiere’. Watching the film conjured a mixture of emotions for them- joy, pride and even a few tears. To see what the project meant to the Veterans and to have the privilege of meeting them really was a once in a lifetime experience.

4. Voices of the Archives

My latest project was Voices of the Archives- a campaign to showcase some of our community collections from the viewpoint of the people who use them most- local community groups, researchers and volunteers. We’ve collected around 30 public responses to various archive collections and used them to create a booklet and 3 pop-up banners (now on the first floor landing at York Explore).

The Voices of the Archives banners

The Voices of the Archives banners

Watching the booklet and banners go from an idea, to a rough draft, to an initial design and finally into physical objects has been a really exciting process. The feedback we’ve received about the collections whilst doing the initial crowd-sourcing has demonstrated the value placed on the archives by our local community- and that’s what a lot of my work has been about; enhancing community engagement with the archives. To see the impact of the Gateway to History project in this way has been a really great way to end my time at Explore.

The final Voices of the Archives booklets!

The final Voices of the Archives booklets!

So there you have it- four of my favourite memories from the past 7 months. I could go on and mention the York Scouts Open Weekend, creating a display of the Poppleton History Society’s archive at Poppleton Library, presenting at my first Gateway to Your Archives workshop… and so much more- but if I did that you’d still be reading this in a week’s time!

So that’s it from me on the blog. To all of you I have met through the Gateway project- thank you for making it such a wonderful project to work on. I leave Explore with lots of happy memories. Goodbye to you all!

The archives team at the end-of Gateway to History project celebration event

The fabulous archives team (and a few lovely extras!) at the end-of Gateway to History project celebration event

 

Digging for gold in our community collections…

Working with Explore’s diverse community collections is fantastic. We manage collections not only from local community groups, but from families, individuals and businesses too. No collection is the same, and that is what makes them so special.

What is even more exciting is when you come across an item in a collection that really stands out. Cataloguing a collection can be, admittedly, a fairly monotonous task but finding hidden gems is what makes it so exciting. It’s like we’re digging for gold, and when we find it we can’t wait to tell you all about it!

Showing off our community collections on our Pinterest board... https://www.pinterest.com/yorkexplore/

Showing off our community collections on our Pinterest board… https://www.pinterest.com/yorkexplore/

This blog post does exactly that. I’ve picked out some of my personal favourites from our community collections, and I hope you’ll see why!

Firstly, I’ll start with the Gray family newspapers (GRF/4/4/7). These special finds were mostly created by children of the Gray family, and include lovely colourful drawings that enhance stories of local and family news. What an adorable way of keeping the whole family in the loop! (Don’t forget- you can click on the images to see a larger version!)

Another ‘gem’ is the ‘first astronomical journal’ (GPP/3) found in the Goodricke and Piggott collection, which tells of exciting astronomical sightings! Detailed illustrations and diagrams have often been included to further explain the sightings, like this one below:

First Astronomical Journal (GPP/3)

First Astronomical Journal (GPP/3)

Find out more about the Goodricke and Piggott collection on Francesca’s blog post, or by checking out our online catalogue.

For an art-lover like me, the Knowles collection (KNO) is naturally one of my favourites. J. W. Knowles was a stained glass window manufacturer, and the collection contains lots of artwork for window designs, like those shown here:

Want to see more of our community collections highlights? We’ll be starting up a #voicesofthearchives Twitter campaign this week to get you talking about our beautiful community collections. Follow us on Twitter @YorkArchivesUK and keep an eye out for photos of collection highlights, and don’t forget to share your thoughts!

If you can’t wait until then- head over to our Pinterest page. Don’t forget- you can search for any of these items on our online catalogue and book into Explore’s Reading Room to take a look for yourself.

Join us – Community Collections Assistant

I’ve some great news to share today, we’ve  opened recruitment for a brand new post on the ALH team, a community collections assistant.

We’re looking for someone to join us for 6 months (full-time) to support our community collections archivist on the York: Gateway to History project.

Our collection already includes over 150 archives created by local groups, societies, businesses and families.  These rich collections are currently only known through difficult to access typed lists of varying standards and detail.

You will pay a key role on making information on these community collections accessible online for the first time, carrying out detailed research and creating authority files – just as I did for the civic archive. You will also be involved in hands on physical processing tasks, such as packaging the archives to ensure their long term survival. We’re looking with someone who is not only interested in working with records, but people too – as you will be involved in supervising small groups of volunteers working on various tasks,  social media, blogging and awareness building such as attending local events in York.

We are looking for someone who is enthusiatic about working with archives and making them accesible to a wider audience, and has excellent literacy, numeracy and computer skills. A degree in a relevant subject area, and experience of using CALM cataloguing software are both desirable but not essential.

This post would suit someone looking for pre-qualification experience, or with an interest in heritage outreach and public history.

You’ll also be a little bit of history yourself as this is the very first new post in our new organisation, Explore York Libraries and Archives, the community benefit society providing York’s city libraries and archives service.

Sounds good? Here’s what you need to do next:

Find out more by downloading an application packfrom www.exploreyork.org.uk by navigating to the ‘Us’ section or following the link to Current Vacancies at the top of the page. If you are unable to access the website please contact jobs@exploreyork.org.uk or call 01904 554247 (8.00am – 4.00pm, Mon – Fri) to request an application pack quoting the job title. 

The closing date for applications is Monday 9th June 2014 at 12 noon.  Interviews will take place in York on Tuesday 1st July.

This post is funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund as part of the £1.6m York: Gateway to History project.