Uncovering York’s Football Heritage: A Look through the Archive

Today, Francesca discusses the work we’ve recently been doing on our Uncovering York’s Sporting Heritage project…

For many of York’s residents, men and women, young and old, the thrill of being in the crowd at Bootham Crescent and cheering on York City’s ‘Minstermen’ has been one of the defining experiences of York life. From the building of Bootham Crescent Stadium in 1923, through the ‘Happy Wanderers’ reaching the FA Cup semi-final in 1955, to the team’s record-breaking 100-point season in 1984, and the historic campaign by the Supporter’s Trust to save the club from financial troubles in 2002, York City’s history is one of highs and lows. It is a story that we have been lucky enough to be able to preserve and help to tell at York Explore, the new home of York City’s archive.

The club’s programme archive, once held at York City Football Club Foundation, has been deposited at York Explore as part of the Uncovering York’s Sporting Heritage project. The project, a collaborative effort between Explore York Libraries and Archives, York City FC Foundation and York City Knights Foundation, is generously funded by the National Lottery Heritage Fund and aims to preserve and share the stories of how sport has shaped York’s communities over the past decades. In addition to hosting a range of activities and working with various community groups to share Explore’s archives with residents, as part of the project we hope to engage local sports teams with the opportunities of managing their own archive, and to expand our own sporting collections by working with local teams who wish to deposit their archives with us; York City FC was the first to do so.

York City’s archive is a rich trove for uncovering the proud history of the club. The collection contains over 2,500 match-day programmes collected by fans over the decades, from single sheets noting team lists and advertising local tea houses, to the glossier modern programmes covering youth teams and charity work undertaken by the club. It also includes an extensive collection of press cuttings, fanzines, tickets and other items that tell the rich story of York City’s players and fans over the twentieth century. In this post we will have a glimpse into just a few of the treasures of the York City FC archive…

The image above is one of the oldest of the archived programmes, for an FA Cup match against Huddersfield Town in 1938. This match is still the most highly-attended game in Bootham Crescent’s history, with over 28,000 spectators. In those days there was neither seating nor covered stands at the stadium, and all viewers watched the match from banked stands behind a memorable white picket fence. The York City collection also includes this picture, reprinted later in the York Press, showing the crowd at the 1938 Huddersfield match.

One of York City’s proudest moments was undoubtedly its historic cup run in the 1954-55 season, when the plucky Minstermen reached the semi-final of the FA Cup. The squad were quickly dubbed the ‘Happy Wanderers’, after the popular 1954 song by The Stargazers, which gave the souvenir booklet below its name.


Another curious commemorative object in the collection is this first-day cover from 1974. First-day covers were special envelopes or postcards, issued by the Royal Mail in very limited runs, to commemorate significant occasions. Fans would send off for the cover and receive it in the post on issue. This cover commemorates York City’s first match in Division Two, having been promoted in 1974, and is signed by the club captain Barry Swallow.

One of the more memorable chapters in York City’s recent history was its financial troubles, and the determined efforts of the Supporters’ Trust to save the club in 2002. The Trust campaigned and raised funds to support the club through a range of endeavours – many of them recorded in the programmes and ephemera in the York City archive – even including walking over hot coals! This poster was one of many carried and waved by Supporters’ Trust members at matches and on marches through the city.

The project to sort, box, catalogue and partially digitise the York City archive has been carried out by Explore staff together with an enthusiastic body of volunteers, made up of York City fans with an interest in the history of the club. Collecting and sorting the material has provided us with a fascinating glimpse into the club’s history: one of highs and lows on and off the pitch, but telling the story of a devoted fanbase. When it is safe for us to reopen our archives service, this collection will be available for public consultation.

Do you belong to a sports club that might be interested in preserving and sharing its own archive? Explore is developing some ‘Managing Your Sporting Archive’ sessions especially for sports teams, giving you all the necessary know-how to start sorting, storing and sharing your archive – see our Events page for more details as they are confirmed, or contact us at archives@exploreyork.org.uk to be kept informed of when they are likely to be. In the meantime, why not check out our Keeping Your Archives page for advice and information on how to get started with managing your archives?

Uncovering York’s Sporting Heritage

Meet Francesca, Archives Intern on our current project, Uncovering York’s Sporting Heritage project. Today she talks you through what we have been up to so far, what’s still to come, and how you can get involved…

For many of us, sports provide some of our fondest memories. Playing games with friends and family as a child, training with local teams, or attending a match on the weekend: sports help us keep healthy, make friends and define our communities. Likewise, looking back at York’s sporting history helps us to uncover the story of how ordinary people in the city had fun, bonded and formed communities over the decades and even centuries.

In 2019 Explore York Archives, York City FC Foundation and York City Knights Rugby League Foundation were awarded £57,500 by the National Lottery Heritage Fund to support ‘Uncovering York’s Sporting Heritage’, a project exploring the importance of sport to York’s residents both past and present. Whilst we are currently having a bit of a project hiatus with the lockdown, we thought we should bring you up to speed with where we are so far!

Burton Stone Lane Adult School football team, c.1919

We have uncovered many interesting facts about York’s sporting heritage: for instance, the city was the location of England’s first recorded football riot in 1660, and the sport was banned entirely in York in 1726! The story of sport in York is also the story of the lives of its residents, from the eighteenth-century high society élite who visited York to attend the races at Clifton Ings or the Knavesmire, and the gentlemen who initially established York’s cricket and rugby clubs, to the railwaymen and Terry’s and Rowntree’s factory workers whose facilities, provided by their socially-conscious Quaker employers, were the first public gyms, public parks and swimming pools in the city.

Horse racing in York, c.1900

As part of this project, we hope to tell the story of this sporting heritage by engaging our communities in the work of the archives. As soon as we are able to, we will be running a number of family sessions and Community Engagement Days to give you a glimpse into the city’s rich sporting history uncovered during the project, and to engage children with this heritage through fun activities. We are also currently producing a reminiscence resource centred on sporting memories for use by dementia groups, helping attendees to reminisce about their own memories of sport in York. Once the Community Stadium opens in the city, we will engage fans with a new artwork in the stadium, and launch a digital installation showcasing some of our amazing sporting archives. It’s bought and ready to go!

Sporting Memories reminiscence session at Bootham Crescent

Of course, this heritage continues to grow, and we hope that going forward our archives can reflect York’s current vibrant sporting life as well. Already as part of the project, with several volunteers, we have collected, sorted and catalogued York City FC’s extensive archives (keep an eye on the blog for our future post on that), including many historic match-day programmes, press cuttings and other memorabilia, which will be accessible at York Explore as soon as we can reopen. When the Community Stadium opens, we hope to gather oral histories from match-day visitors to the stadium, to record their valuable memories of York’s sporting heritage for the future. The first phase of our schools programme was successfully completed before lockdown, and we’re busy working on the content for the second and third phases so that we can continue our work as soon as it is safe to do so.

Archives collated by York City Knights Foundation, 2019

One of the big aims of the project is to help local sports teams and interested individuals to take care of their own archives better, and to help us preserve the story of York’s sporting heritage for the future. This is where you come in! If you are involved in a club and would like to donate your archives to us once we reopen (or in the future) then get in touch with us at archives@exploreyork.org.uk and we’ll register your interest ready for when we can restart the project. There is absolutely no obligation to do so, and if you would prefer to get some advice on how to keep your sporting archives better in-house, keep an eye out for our half-day Managing Your Sporting Archives workshops later in the year, or have a look at our general advice and guidance on the Keeping Your Archive pages on our website.

We are really excited by this project, and are really looking forward to being able to deliver the rest of our objectives as soon as we can! In the meantime, why not have a look at some of our sporting photographs available on Explore York Images, our new image portal?

Announcing the Launch of Explore York Images!

y_11846 Copyright: Explore York Libraries and Archives / City of York Council 2020.

York is a city that has been captured in countless images, and many of these are held at Explore York Archives. Through these photographs, illustrations, maps, and archival documents you can walk forgotten streets, visit the old city centre slums, find out about York’s stained glass history, view key events, and learn more about the people who lived in our city and the surrounding area.

Such a fantastic, ever-growing collection certainly deserves widespread attention, and so we have launched a new website to celebrate York’s visual history. Explore York Images replaces Imagine York (our previous image portal) and offers three key improvements.

Evolving Content

This website has been designed to accommodate a collection that is always growing. In addition to the images already online, we have thousands that have never been visible to the public before. We are working hard to prepare these images and will be uploading them in batches. You can easily keep an eye on new additions by navigating to the ‘Recently Added’ page.

Site Navigation

With a new controlled vocabulary and improved metadata, it should now be easier for you to find specific images. You can use the search bar to specify a keyword, such as ‘boat’, and then select categories to narrow down the results.

You can also create ‘Lightboxes’, which function like pin boards for you to collect images as you search. For example, if you were researching York’s Adult Schools you might create a Lightbox with the same title and collect all relevant images to return to later.

Residents of Hungate decorated their street for the York Adult Schools’ Jubilee, 1907.
y374_32 (c) Copyright: Explore York Libraries and Archives / City of York Council 2020.

Easy and Immediate Purchase

Many users will want to reproduce images on their websites, blogs, printed materials, and so on. The new website makes it easy to calculate costs according to your intended usage. You can also purchase images directly from the website, so downloading and using assets will be a fast and simple process. Every purchase you make will support us in our mission to preserve York’s archival heritage and promote it to future generations.

Click here to explore the new website. We hope you enjoy diving into York’s history!

The final tableau at the Historical Pageant, 1909
y_11580 (c) Copyright: City of York Council / Explore York Libraries and Archives Mutual Ltd

Missing York? Join our Caption Challenge!

Residents and fond visitors of York, we need your help! If you are missing the sights and streets of our beautiful city during lockdown, then join our caption challenge to explore it in photographs! We have 900 images of York in need of identification and dating (approximate dates are fine). Drawing on the collective knowledge of our community, we will then upload the photographs onto our new Explore York Images website, sharing more of York’s unique history with the world.

Copyright: Explore York Libraries and Archives / City of York Council 2020.

Some of the photographs are easy to identify, some are not so easy. This will be a great way to test how well you know York! In some cases there will already be information on the image – for example, we may have the name of the building but not the street. In other cases, there will be no identifying information at all.

How to join the challenge

We will be releasing 100 new images a week (on Wednesdays) over the next 9 weeks – starting 29 April.

If you are not a member of Flickr, then you will need to join here to add comments.

You can view the images by visiting our Flickr gallery here. Once you are a member of Flickr, you will be able to participate.

You can add information about any of the photographs by clicking on the image and using the comment box below. Feel free to add whatever useful information you can. Do you know something about a business that appears in an image? Do you recognise any people or a particular building? Most importantly, where is it and when was it taken?

To share your progress, you can Tweet us at @YorkArchivesUK and use any of the following hashtags #captionchallenge #missingyork #exploreMORE #LibrariesFromHome

Thank you and good luck!

Digging for gold in our community collections…

Working with Explore’s diverse community collections is fantastic. We manage collections not only from local community groups, but from families, individuals and businesses too. No collection is the same, and that is what makes them so special.

What is even more exciting is when you come across an item in a collection that really stands out. Cataloguing a collection can be, admittedly, a fairly monotonous task but finding hidden gems is what makes it so exciting. It’s like we’re digging for gold, and when we find it we can’t wait to tell you all about it!

Showing off our community collections on our Pinterest board... https://www.pinterest.com/yorkexplore/

Showing off our community collections on our Pinterest board… https://www.pinterest.com/yorkexplore/

This blog post does exactly that. I’ve picked out some of my personal favourites from our community collections, and I hope you’ll see why!

Firstly, I’ll start with the Gray family newspapers (GRF/4/4/7). These special finds were mostly created by children of the Gray family, and include lovely colourful drawings that enhance stories of local and family news. What an adorable way of keeping the whole family in the loop! (Don’t forget- you can click on the images to see a larger version!)

Another ‘gem’ is the ‘first astronomical journal’ (GPP/3) found in the Goodricke and Piggott collection, which tells of exciting astronomical sightings! Detailed illustrations and diagrams have often been included to further explain the sightings, like this one below:

First Astronomical Journal (GPP/3)

First Astronomical Journal (GPP/3)

Find out more about the Goodricke and Piggott collection on Francesca’s blog post, or by checking out our online catalogue.

For an art-lover like me, the Knowles collection (KNO) is naturally one of my favourites. J. W. Knowles was a stained glass window manufacturer, and the collection contains lots of artwork for window designs, like those shown here:

Want to see more of our community collections highlights? We’ll be starting up a #voicesofthearchives Twitter campaign this week to get you talking about our beautiful community collections. Follow us on Twitter @YorkArchivesUK and keep an eye out for photos of collection highlights, and don’t forget to share your thoughts!

If you can’t wait until then- head over to our Pinterest page. Don’t forget- you can search for any of these items on our online catalogue and book into Explore’s Reading Room to take a look for yourself.

Hello there! Introducing Explore’s Newbie…

Hello there! I am Jenny McGarvey, the latest newbie here at York Explore (when I say “newbie”, that’s not technically correct. You might recognise me from my previous blog post, “Getting to Grips with Criminal Histories…”, posted back in March when I was a placement student here, but I am delighted to be back as a member of staff!).

Cataloguing at the end of my first week as Community Collections Assistant

Cataloguing at the end of my first week as Community Collections Assistant

I am the new Community Collections Assistant and I am very excited to be working on the fabulous York: Gateway to History project. My role is to work with Sarah to help her deliver different aspects of the project; from winding up the Archives Roadshow and cataloguing the collections though to helping deliver the Gateway to your Archives workshops and our Community Collections volunteering programme.

 

Some of our volunteers working hard cataloguing some of the community collections.

Some of our volunteers working hard cataloguing some of the community collections.

One aspect of the project that I am very excited about is the creation of an art installation that will reflect the different views of the local community on the question “What should York remember?”. This is the question that has been put to you, the general public, during our Archives Roadshow sessions that have taken place across all of York’s local libraries over the past few months. A local artist will be using your responses to create an installation that will be displayed in the first floor landing at York Explore.

I went along to my first Archives Roadshow session on Monday afternoon at Strensall library, which made for a very interesting first day! We also went along to Dunnington Library yesterday evening for our final stop in the Archives Roadshow journey. It was clear that local history is a popular passion in both Dunnington and Strensall, and it was lots of fun chatting to local residents about the things that they think are important to York’s past. I cannot wait to see the final outcome of the art piece, and how it reflects the huge range of responses we have had about what we should remember about York’s history.

 

“What should York remember?” - some responses given at Strensall library Archives Roadshow.

“What should York remember?” – some responses given at Strensall library Archives Roadshow.

I am also very much looking forward to being involved in the Gateway to your Archives workshops, where we will be encouraging local community groups to develop and manage their own archives. The workshops have been a fantastic success so far and they are an amazing opportunity for us to meet lots of local community group members and help them enhance their archival skills.

 

One of the Gateway to your Archives workshops.

One of the Gateway to your Archives workshops.

Today I have been busy doing my first bit of cataloguing which I am thoroughly enjoying. It has given me the opportunity to have a quick nosey at some very interesting documents and learn how to actually organise a collection logically. I am getting to know the catalogue system and finding it easier each time I log a new entry! I can tell already that I am really going to enjoy this aspect of my job.

You’ll certainly hear a lot more from me over the next few months on our outreach and cataloguing work as part of the Gateway to History project here at York Explore, as I’ll be keeping you updated on our latest events and progress through the blog as well as Twitter, Pinterest and Flickr.

Coming soon to a library near you…

This year we’re pleased to announce that we’re taking archives and local history out across Explore’s branch libraries in our first ever Archives Roadshow.

We’re thrilled with our new archive service at Explore York but we know that for many of you, the local library is still the heart and soul of your community. That’s why Francesca and I will be touring all branch libraries during 2015, giving you a chance to discover more.

We've had all our publicity professionally designed so you'll know what to look out for in your branch

Seen these leaflets around? It’s all Gateway to History!

Expect to see shiny pop up banners and leaflets advertising the Gateway to History project and the Gateway to Your Archives training workshops; discover how to use the archive catalogue; see copies of items from our community archives; ask us all about the new archive service and share your local history stories with us.

But we’d like you to get involved as well. Throughout 2015 we’re asking you, What should York Remember? We want your thoughts on the people, places, events and memories that have shaped our city and the way we live.

We launched this event at Residents Festival in York Explore on 31st January and we got some facinating responses including ‘The remarkable lives of ordinary people’, ‘the smell of chocolate’ and ‘disability rights in York’. We had some truly inspirational discussions and even some children popped in to draw us a picture of York Minster!

Examples from our activity at Residents Weekend 2015

Examples from our activity at Residents Festival 2015

If you’d like to have your say and learn more, the first 3 dates of the Roadshow are:

Tang Hall Library – 17th February 2015
Clifton Library – 25th February 2015
Acomb Library – 26th February 2015

Expect to see us at each branch library at least twice throughout 2015 and we’ll be advertising more dates throughout the year. Keep a look out for this eye catching poster in your local library to see when we’re next coming to you!

Look out for this poster in your local library!

Look out for this poster in your local library as it will include dates for each branch

From April 2015, you’ll also get a chance to see our popular WW1 pop-up banner exhibition as it tours the branches. Its currently upstairs in the foyer at York Explore Library so if you’re popping in, take a look. Check with your local library over the coming months and discover when its coming to you.

Our WW1 banner exhibition - coming soon to a branch near you!

Our WW1 banner exhibition – currently on the landing at York Explore

We look forward to meeting you all as we travel around the city and discover what York should remember!

Our new Community Collections Pinterest board: The highlights so far…

Over the past few weeks, the Explore team has been busy at the main library preparing the archive for when we open on the 5th of January. Me, Georgie and Sarah have been getting stuck into the Community Collections by organising, cataloguing and re-boxing them so that they can be easily navigated and used by everyone. Up until now, I have been doing this without actually seeing any of the archives themselves. But how? I hear you cry! Well thanks to the dedicated work of previous volunteers and archivists we have managed to use many of the existing lists to put entire collections on our CALM catalogue system, some of which will be searchable online when we reopen.

20141202_152630

Our York Conservative Association collection (YCA), re-boxed and ready to go!

Since we opened up our first archive box a few weeks back, I have finally been able to set eyes on our collections for the first time and it is amazing just how diverse and visually impressive they are in the flesh! You can see some of our favourite items that we have discovered so far on our new Community Collections Pinterest board.

Pinterest
One of my personal favourites has been the York and District Boy Scouts Association collection, chock full of amazing scrapbooks containing drawings, photographs and memories from scout life like outings, events and cuttings like this one.

Then there is the Yorkshire Musical Festival collection which contains beautifully printed tickets and programmes from the 19th Century as well as a list of what was worn by attendees of the Fancy Ball, which we tweeted about last week.

On top of this, another highlight has been our York Mystery Plays collection which contains stunningly painted set designs, costume sketchbooks and annotated scripts from the 1960s and 1970s. But this only scratches the surface!

Over the course of 2015, we will gradually be able to make more collections available for you to have a rummage through and hopefully make some amazing discoveries of your own.

Make sure you stay tuned to the Community Collections Pinterest board for more archive sneak peeks in the near future!

The Community archive collections are coming!

January 5th is fast approaching and the whole team is busy preparing York Explore for opening. Right now a team of library and archive staff are hard at work stocking the shelves and preparing archive collections.

Preparing the archives has been a process that Francesca, Georgie and I have been working on since August and we were all so excited when we got a huge scale delivery from Deepstore two weeks ago. It was the first time since I started my job back in January that I had actually seen the community collections I manage.

The archives arrived from Deepstore, who are based in the salt mines in Cheshire

The archives arriving from Deepstore from the salt mines in Cheshire where the archives have been kept safely while we built our strongroom.

We had around 300 boxes delivered, most of which were Civic records to be processed by Justine but it also included some previously inaccessible community collections. We haven’t had everything sent back as we are doing this gradually to make sure that the collections we make accessible are catalogued and properly packaged.

The first of the community collections safely on shelves in the strongroom

The first of the community collections safely on shelves in the strongroom

Due to the hard work, and a real team effort, we’re pleased to announce that so far we have 15 community collections ready for researchers to use when our doors open.  Justine is hard at work making sections of the Civic archive ready, which will form the bulk of the archives ready for use.

Here’s a taster of what community collections you’ll be able to discover:

  • The York Art Society
  • York Rugby League Club
  • York Musical Theatre Society
  • Boy Scouts Association York
  • York Educational Settlement
  • Cundall Family Papers and Photographs

DSCF5395

The Boy Scouts collection is full of exciting finds including loads of troop photographs and log books!

All of the collections we have available will be searchable via the Library catalogue and we’re currently working on a programme of work which will allow us to continue making collections accessible gradually throughout 2015. We’re creating a Pinterest board to showcase these collections, similar to the one we have for our First World War material. We’ll also be sharing collection updates via our website and here on the blog.

Finally, I just wanted to say a huge thanks to Georgie who is a Reading and Learning Advisor at York Explore. She came across to this project on secondment to gain archive experience and she has been responsible for half of the collections we’re making accessible in January. You’ll probably see Georgie around the library as she is returning to her previous role and will be working in all areas of the library and archive service.

Georgie, complete with high viz working on one of our collections

Georgie complete with high viz working on one of our collections

Francesca has been responsibe for the other half of the collections and you’ll also see her and myself around as she’ll be working with me throughout 2015 to deliver outreach activities. I’ll be blogging shortly with more details about what you can expect to see from the Gateway to History project next year.

We’ll see you in January!

Something new is coming to Poppleton…

I’ve been quiet for a while on the blog, but we’ve had some fantastic posts from Francesca and Georgie,  keeping us all entertained!

Our new archive facility at York Explore Library will open on the 5th January, but how does this affect our branch libraries? I’m pleased to announce the launch of our latest pilot project with Poppleton History Society (PHS) which is  giving  us the opportunity to share archives and local history through our branch libraries in collaboration with a community partner.

The project started with PHS  approaching us and requesting to store and make accessible their archive collection in Poppleton Library. Initially there were concerns around whether we would have enough space, as Poppleton is one of our smaller branch libraries. The Society had purchased two filing cabinets to house their archive material and we agreed to put the cabinets in the Library asking them to  select items of local interest to go inside.

The Filing cabinets are in a great location in the library

The Filing cabinets look great in Poppleton Library!

We tasked PHS with cataloguing their own collection, as we felt they knew more about it than we did. I provided them with a box list template to make sure they captured the most important information. It was great to see them rise to the challenge and enjoy the process! They enjoyed it so much that three members of the society have been the first to book onto the Gateway to Your Archives  training workshops running next year (details to follow shortly).

PHS will be creating a display of their archive to spark visitors interest.

PHS will be creating a display of their archive to spark visitors interest.

We had no idea what material they had stored away in the garages and attics of their members but we were thrilled with what they came back to us with. The collection contains a wealth of information on the history of Poppleton especially relating to local schools and historic buildings, including the Tithe Barn. It also includes information on events and projects the Society have been involved with, in particular the themed historical banquets they run every year. The Society are currently transcribing a series of oral history recordings, and these will be made available as part of the collection over the coming months.

Justs a sample of the treasures waiting to be discovered in the archive

Justs a sample of the treasures waiting to be discovered in the archive

We held a fantastic launch event for this project a couple of weeks ago, everyone was so positive and pleased to see a new resource being made available in their local library. You can see all the photographs from the event on our Flickr page.

IMG_2107

Sarah at the launch event thanking PHS and Debbie, manager at Poppleton Library for their hard work on the project

This pilot is part of the HLF Gateway to History project and demonstrates new and innovative ways of sharing archives and local history with our branch libraries. We’ve now got a fantastic working relationship with PHS which will enable us to work more with them in the future.

Julian Crabb, Secretary of PHS shares his experiences working with Explore on this project

Julian Crabb, Secretary of PHS shares his experiences of working with Explore on this project

The Poppleton History Society Archive is now available in Poppleton Library for anyone to view. The collection is still owned by PHS so if you have any questions about the history of the village or the collection you can contact Julian Crabb, Secretary,  at  johnjcrabb@gmail.com.

Watch our website over the coming months as the catalogue for the PHS archive will be made available on the Poppleton Library page. Why not head over to Poppleton Library and take a look at the archive for yourself?