Bye Everyone!

The time has come for me to leave Explore so I thought I’d share a few of my favourite memories with you from the last 7 months. And what an incredible 7 months it’s been! I feel very privileged to have had the chance to work on the York: Gateway to History project- I’ve met so many wonderful people, from community groups and volunteers to researchers and colleagues.

I really feel like the project has had an invaluable impact both in terms of vastly enhancing the way the archives are stored and in terms of community engagement- and to have played a part in it has been brilliant. But enough of the soppy stuff- here are some of my personal highlights…

  1. Working with the community collections volunteers

Working with the 8 regular Thursday volunteers has been an absolute treat. We were lucky enough to get a wonderful mix of volunteers that all worked really well as a team. In total, they catalogued 5 large archive collections over a period of 6 months (wait for it- that’s 99 boxes, 203 volumes and 32 rolls in total!). They really were fantastic.

2. Watching the ‘York Panorama: What York Means To Us’ art installation come together

As an art-lover this had to have a place in my favourite memories didn’t it?! Since I started at Explore, I have watched the art installation slowly take shape- from the initial concept into a physical installation on the first floor landing at York Explore. It has been incredible to see how the brilliant Emily Harvey took people’s personal memories of York and turned them into a vibrant panorama that accurately depicts how York residents see their city.

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3. Normandy Veterans ‘film premiere’

Explore has done a lot of work with the York Normandy Veterans Association to help them create their own archive (NVA) through the York: Gateway to History project. Most of the work on the Veterans project had already been done by the time I arrived at Explore back in June, but I did some transcriptions from oral history interviews with the veterans and learned a lot about them (and just how inspirational- yet astonishingly modest- they are!). In December, we created a short film telling the story of the Veterans and their archive.

20160126_103618We invited the Veterans to Explore to have their very own ‘film premiere’. Watching the film conjured a mixture of emotions for them- joy, pride and even a few tears. To see what the project meant to the Veterans and to have the privilege of meeting them really was a once in a lifetime experience.

4. Voices of the Archives

My latest project was Voices of the Archives- a campaign to showcase some of our community collections from the viewpoint of the people who use them most- local community groups, researchers and volunteers. We’ve collected around 30 public responses to various archive collections and used them to create a booklet and 3 pop-up banners (now on the first floor landing at York Explore).

The Voices of the Archives banners

The Voices of the Archives banners

Watching the booklet and banners go from an idea, to a rough draft, to an initial design and finally into physical objects has been a really exciting process. The feedback we’ve received about the collections whilst doing the initial crowd-sourcing has demonstrated the value placed on the archives by our local community- and that’s what a lot of my work has been about; enhancing community engagement with the archives. To see the impact of the Gateway to History project in this way has been a really great way to end my time at Explore.

The final Voices of the Archives booklets!

The final Voices of the Archives booklets!

So there you have it- four of my favourite memories from the past 7 months. I could go on and mention the York Scouts Open Weekend, creating a display of the Poppleton History Society’s archive at Poppleton Library, presenting at my first Gateway to Your Archives workshop… and so much more- but if I did that you’d still be reading this in a week’s time!

So that’s it from me on the blog. To all of you I have met through the Gateway project- thank you for making it such a wonderful project to work on. I leave Explore with lots of happy memories. Goodbye to you all!

The archives team at the end-of Gateway to History project celebration event

The fabulous archives team (and a few lovely extras!) at the end-of Gateway to History project celebration event

 

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Digging for gold in our community collections: Round Two!

Just like last week’s blog post, this post focuses on some individual items from our wonderful community archive collections (and yes, I am biased- but I hope you’ll soon see why I think they’re so wonderful!). Don’t forget- you can click on any of the images in this post to see a larger version of them!
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A collection I’ve been focusing on a lot at the moment is the York Scouts collection (BSA). It is a lovely collection and features lots of camp log books, like the one pictured below. These detail excursions, activities Scout members took part in, and even what food they ate! This one in particular features this little hand-drawn camp map…

BSA

A Scouts log book, complete with this colourful hand-drawn map! (BSA)

You may have heard us mention the York Cemetery Company collection (CEM) in previous posts, as it’s a collection that our volunteers worked away at earlier this year. It is predominantly made up of bulky volumes, but the volume I want to show you is one that particularly stood out…

This volume, titled ‘Designs for Sepulchural Monuments’, contains plenty of intricate drawings of gravestone designs. Whilst cemeteries may not be the nicest topic, this volume certainly sheds some light on what it is like to design and produce gravestones.
More favourites of mine are these photographs, taken from the Cundall family collection (CPP). They show women (some presumably from the Cundall family) climbing a glacier in the Swiss Alps.

What I love most about this photo is how the women are dressed- in skirts and shoes that look rather impractical (and chilly!) for climbing, let alone climbing a glacier! Whilst the collection provides no background information on this particular photograph, I like to imagine the back story behind it; were this women climbing the glacier for a cause, or just as a fun holiday excursion?

Those are my highlights for this week! I’ve decided to make blogs posts showcasing what I like to call community collections ‘gems’ a regular thing, so expect to see similar posts over the next few months!Picture2

If you’ve come across something from our community collections that you think is particularly special, whether you’ve seen it in our Archives Reading Room or on our social media sites, we’d like to hear about it! Tweet us @YorkArchivesUK using #voicesofthearchives or email me at jennifer.mcgarvey@exploreyork.org.uk. Don’t forget- you can head over to our Pinterest page to see more community collections, or even book into our Reading Room and take a look for yourself!

Popping into Poppleton’s History!

Calling all history-bods, archive boffins and Poppletonians! There’s a new display at Poppleton Library and you must go and see it!

Having fun setting up the Poppleton History Society display with Secretary, Julian Crabb

Having fun setting up the Poppleton History Society display with Secretary, Julian Crabb

I’ve recently been working with the Poppleton History Society (PHS) to create a display showcasing some items from their wonderful archive collection. Their collection first became publicly available in 2014 as part of Explore’s Gateway to History project, and is located in Poppleton Library.


PHS has been a thriving society since 1989 and publishes publications, holds social events such as their bi-annual banquets, and takes part in local archaeology.

For their first library display, PHS Secretary Julian and I decided to focus on the theme of ‘Recreation in Poppleton’, and have selected various records that demonstrate the huge range of recreational activities that the people of Poppleton have been and still are getting involved in. From tennis and football to socialising down by the river- they certainly know how to have fun! We’ve taken copies of original documents and used these for the display.

'Recreation in Poppleton: A display of the PHS archive collection'

‘Recreation in Poppleton: A display of the PHS archive’

Creating the exhibition alongside the Society’s Secretary, Julian, has been great fun, and it’s been lovely to explore their archive some more- previously knowing very little about it myself. Their collection consists of a huge range of material- from photographs and publicity to oral history recordings and transcriptions produced as part of their oral history project. If you’re a local Poppleton inhabitant looking for a starting point to conduct your local history research- then look no further! Poppleton History Society’s archive collection is fantastic, and you can find a box list of their items on the Explore website.

The PHS archive in Poppleton Library- open for public access!

The PHS archive in Poppleton Library- open for public access!

So what are you waiting for?! Head down to Poppleton Library and take a look for yourself!