Final thoughts…

Three months go really fast, especially when you always have something to do and you enjoy what you do. So have been my three months working at York Explore Archive: quick, but really interesting. Certainly, working with Julie-Ann, Tiffany and the volunteers who work in this project has been a wonderful experience that I will never forget.

In these months, the archive has allowed me to learn how York was between 19th and 20th centuries. It was, without doubt, a very different city from the one we know today: for example, The Shambles was not so dreamful as to open Harry Potter shops for tourists. Streets such as Walmgate or Hungate were areas where some of the poorest people of the city lived. And, of course, York was not the clean and healthy city that we know today. Nonetheless, the huge amount of documentation of the Health Committee and other institutions show that the health care was a matter of great concern to the authorities.

4398[2]

Butchers selling their wares in The Shambles in the 1890s

It would be really hard to try to explain in a few lines everything I have learned, so I think I am not going to try to!. I think it is much easier if you come to the archive and discover yourself all the possibilities it offers. So, I want to encourage all people living in York to come to this lovely centre one day to learn a bit more about this astonishing city, or even encourage them to work as volunteers on one of these projects. I can guarantee that if you come you are going to discover many of the secrets that this city hides. After all, an archive like this is a “box” where the entire memory of a city is stored, waiting for its citizens to open it up to learn.

Finally, I want to finish this post by thanking all the people who have supported me during these months to make this possible. All of you are an important part of this incredible experience.

Thank you so much everyone and thank you for reading,

Carlos Parra

Advertisements

Initial impressions…

This month we have a post from the newest Past Caring team member: our fantastic Erasmus intern from Spain…

Hello everybody,

I’m writing on this blog to introduce myself as the Erasmus intern who will be working at York Explore Library and Archive during the following months. My name is Carlos Parra and I am a graduate in History from the University of Valladolid (Spain) since July 2017.

Like all students, in the months before finishing this stage of my life I was totally full of doubts and fears: what’s coming now? What future waits? Will I be able to work in the field I have studied? I have never faced such a big decision and I really did not know what to do! The big moment was getting closer and closer and while this happened I was more confused about what to do. Finally, I got it, what I needed was time to think. In the meantime, I needed a way that would help me to prepare myself for the future so I decided to join the Erasmus programme.

The Law Faculty, Valladolid

The magnificent building which is home to the Faculty of Law and the Archives of the University of Valladolid. I gained experience in the Archives before coming to York.

Actually, some of my friends had tried this opportunity before and their experiences were the key in persuading me that this was the right way. So, I started a long search for an institution that would accept me as an Erasmus trainee; and that was not easy at all. I sent an uncountable amount of emails, more than a hundred I am sure. Luckily for me, before I finished my Degree an institution accepted my application and agreed to welcome me as an Erasmus trainee. Furthermore, it was an archive – York Explore! One of the fields I am most proud to work in during my career.

A few months later, everything was ready for my trip and a few days before I started my traineeship I was flying to York. I cannot explain the mixture of nervousness and happiness that I felt: on one side, I thought I was leaving many things behind and, on the other hand, I just thought on the months to come. A new city, new friends, new job and a lot of experience before coming back to Spain. I can only thank all the people who helped me in my first days and made my arrival much easier.

Since starting work at the archive I have realised that many things about the arrangement and the organization are very similar to Spanish archives. However, a lot of things are different and this has offered me the opportunity to learn new points of view about the treatment of documents and about the methods used to bring citizens closer to the archives, one point in which Spanish archives, only used by academics, have a lot to learn. Furthermore, I think it is incredible how volunteers work together with archivists on cataloguing and repackaging tasks; it is a very strange situation to imagine this in a Spanish archive but I think it would be worthwhile for Spanish archivists to learn about this. In general, there are many things that Spanish archivists should learn about our English neighbour and I want to take the opportunity to do this during my Erasmus traineeship.

Certainly, the experience I am going to get during the following months has no price. Just a month here has been incredible, and I feel my work is very satisfying. 

Carlos

Learning paper repairs

This work has been basically split in two parts: on one side, the work with Julie-Ann has consisted of helping to catalogue one of the collections in the archive: the nineteenth and twentieth- century poor law and health care records of York, such as minutes of the Committees and improvement plans of the city of York.    On the other side, the work with Tiffany has consisted of helping to clean and repackage the items in the same collection.  Furthermore, I have had the opportunity to learn about repairing documents. This has allowed to me to improve my abilities as an archivist and historian, but also I have been able to learn more about this incredible city, thanks to the huge variety of documents that the archive keeps.

I think a month has already passed and it is just incredible. Time has passed very quickly but I am happy that I am discovering many new things and, of course, there is a lot to learn about this incredible city and about the documents.

Many thanks for reading,

Carlos Parra.