A Visit to the Teesside Archive

Helen Kendall in Teesside Archive strongroom

Helen Kendall (ACR) showing me around the Teesside Archive stores.

Last week I had the wonderful opportunity to visit the Teesside Archive in Middlesbrough and speak with conservator Helen Kendall (ACR) about some conservation/preservation techniques, as well as have a tour of the building and archive store.

I’d been having several practical issues while consolidating degrading leather bindings of the Past Caring Project. Some of the bindings are covered in full leather, bound with the flesh side out (also called reverse leather). During the application of a consolidant to help reduce powdering, the consolidant mixture was occasionally leaving brush marks on the leather, even after drying. I reached out to some conservators in the area to see if anyone had a similar experience, hoping to receive some tips and tricks to help reduce the undesired effects. Through this, I met Helen, who is also working series of reverse leather bindings.

 

One of my favourite little bits of the tour was seeing a series of picturesque wooden slide boxes in one of the strongrooms.

Helen also showed me around the conservation space, which among many things, houses a large upright light box and an freestanding press.

Helen demonstrated her technique for consolidation and we talked about methods for protecting the binding after the treatment, which I found very helpful to see in person.

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I will be certainly applying some of the techniques to the Past Caring Project work.

 

Thank you to Helen Kendall and the Teesside Archive for the day, it was a lovely opportunity to visit and speak with another North Yorkshire conservator.

 

For more information on the Teesside Archive:
https://www.middlesbrough.gov.uk/leisure-events-libraries-and-hubs/teesside-archives

 

Images: Tiffany Eng Moore

Call for Preservation Volunteers

We’re currently looking for volunteers for the Past Caring Project! If you are interested in the Archives or enjoy doing practical work (no computers involved!) this is the role for you. No prior preservation experience is necessary.

You will be handling original nineteenth and twentieth-century records: cleaning; relabeling; repackaging; with the potential for more in depth work if you’re interested. The work you carry out will enable these records to be used by readers/researchers and will help protect the records from further damage.

Through the work you will have the opportunity to learn basic archive preservation skills.

We are looking for volunteers to help us on a Friday morning or afternoon slot (10-12:30 or 2-4.30pm) for a period of up to 22 weeks. The volunteer project will commence with an introduction and training session the afternoon of June the 23th 2017. At the completion of the project, an optional fun bookbinding related workshop will be held.

If you are interested in participating in this project, please email me at tiffany.moore@exploreyork.org.uk by 16 June 2017.

You can visit the project page on our blog for more general information on the Past Caring project:
https://citymakinghistory.wordpress.com/past-caring-project/

And for all project updates: https://citymakinghistory.wordpress.com/category/past-caring-project/

Why Conservation?

 

In the Past Caring project, there are approximately 2000 bound items and boxed paper documents of the York Workhouse and Poor Law collection which are in need of some form of preservation or conservation action. That’s a lot of items to go through! Before their arrival to Explore, the collections were housed first in the Workhouse and Poor Law Union’s deposit and then the York City Art Gallery. Through general use and non-ideal storage conditions of the collection’s 200 odd years, some of the documents and books are in a physical state where they can’t be produced for users without incurring further damage. The purpose of the conservation aspect of the Past Caring Project is to make sure the collection is stored, produced, and used in a way that will help maintain its longevity. Items that are especially damaged or vulnerable will be given remedial repairs and practical treatments to stabilize and help avoid future damage.

An overview of the historic damage

While some of the collection is in relatively good condition for its age, many paper documents and volumes have issues that present challenges. The following types of damage are common for archive material, but in this collection the problems have been exacerbated by its previous storage conditions.

One of the major challenges to be addressed is the significant amounts of powdery red rot in the collection’s leather bindings. Red rot is the acidic degradation of leather, which over time causes the leather to become weak, often splitting or breaking on areas it should flex. Many of the affected bindings are in the later stages of deterioration, the leather becoming powdery and coming off. This is problematic for users as it is a skin and respiratory irritant, but also because the powdery deposits easily transfer to shelving; reading room surfaces; on and inside other documents; and the readers themselves.

At one point in its history, the collections have been stored in humid or damp conditions. This allowed for severe mould damage on occur a portion of the bindings. While the mould is currently inactive, large deposits remain on the volumes and documents. Inside the bindings, the text blocks are cockled and discoloured, with losses and pages adhered together. As the bindings are fragile and the mould deposits are a health and safety hazard for users, the bindings cannot be accessed in their current state.

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Many bindings have physical damage from heavy use and improper storage. This includes abrasions, bumped corners, tears, covers falling off, spines detached, and more. The paper documents have rusting metal fastenings and severe paper tears, pleats and crumpling which limits readability and cause handling difficulties.

Other types of damage include extensive sooty black dirt throughout the collection, brittle papers, and iron gall ink damage. Through the course of the project I will blog further about the conservation issues described.

What’s the plan?

Prevention
The specialized archive store where the collection is currently housed was purpose built to hold Explore’s on-site collection (for more information, read about the Gateway to History project). The store operates within PD5454:2012 guidance. This means that the store follows published recommendations for the storage of library and archive materials, which include guidance for ranges of temperature and humidity levels within the store that the collection is best suited. This aids in slowing further degradation of the material. The archive store also has a security system and measures against water ingress and fire.

The items which have been damaged by improper packaging or storage will be addressed by repackaging to mitigate further damage when it’s used and moved.

Intervention
Using a variety of conservation techniques, the project will address the most pressing of concerns for the collection, with the goal of making the material available to use. This includes surface cleaning of documents to remove heavy deposits of sooty black dirt; making paper documents accessible by unfolding and pressing; repairing severe tears and losses to paper documents and bindings; cleaning and removing deposits from mould damaged items; consolidating the leathers and providing protective covers on bindings with red rot to enable reader handling.

I will continue to post about the project  and  the conservation as it progresses, if you’re interested in reading about a particular topic, feel free to contact me with suggestions!

Thanks for reading,

Tiffany

 

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For more information about conservation I’ve added some links that may be of interest

Institute of Conservation

Archives and Records Association

 

A new addition to the Past Caring team

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Hello all,

Today I am writing to introduce myself as the newest member of the York Explore team: the Past Caring Project Conservator. Over the next year and a half, I will be working with the Project Archivist Julie-Ann Vickers on the Past Caring Project (find out more about the Past Caring Project on our dedicated page, or our previous blog posts).

While Julie-Ann works on researching and cataloguing the informational content of the archive, my task is to take care of the physical aspects of the collection. I will be assessing the condition of the archives and carrying out preservation and remedial conservation work to ensure the material can be handled by readers, as well as ensuring the future accessibility of the material.

As a book and archive conservator, my goal for this project is to help balance the preservation and access needs of a collection. Maintaining the physical collection is important to keep the records available for the long term and to enable readers access to its intellectual value. In my next blog post, I will talk more about the specific conservation issues of the Past Caring project.

In the months ahead I will be looking for volunteers to help with the preservation and conservation process, so if you are interested in working with historic material, drop me a line or keep up to date with the Explore York blog as more information on how to volunteer will be posted in future blog posts.

I will be posting here about once a month and regularly contributing to our twitter account.

Thanks for reading!

Tiffany

Thoughts? Questions? Just want to chat about conservation? Feel free to email me at archives@exploreyork.org.uk