Where Do You Think You Are? A Community Collections Tour of York – Part 2

Last week I posted Part 1 of a series of 3 posts about my ‘Community Collections Tour’ of York. I talked about John Goodricke, the Morrell family, and the Gray family, most well known for their role as prominent solicitors. This week, I’ll be looking at another long-standing family legal firm, and about a York businessman and politician whose name is probably familiar to many York residents, visitors, and anyone interested in the city’s history and the history of the railways.

Munby & Scott:

Just around the corner from the offices of Gray’s Solicitors on Duncombe Place are the old offices of another long-established law firm, Munby and Scott.

The Munby family were solicitors in York from as early as 1665. In 1878, Henry Venn Scott became a partner in the firm. From 1838, their offices were located at No. 18 Blake Street (which was actually No. 3 Blake Street up until the mid-1950s when the street was renumbered). The house in which their offices were located was originally built in 1789 for a member of the Woodhouse family, who were connected to the Munbys by marriage.

No. 18 Blake Street housed the offices of Munby & Scott from 1838 - 2007.

No. 18 Blake Street housed the offices of Munby & Scott from 1838 – 2007.

George Leeman:

The statue of George Leeman stands just outside the city walls as you walk from the station.

Statue of George Leeman, located just outside the walls of the City as you walk from the Station

Statue of George Leeman, located just outside the walls of the City as you walk from the Station

Inscription on the statue of George Leeman.

Inscription on the statue of George Leeman.

Leeman is most well-known for his connection to the railways and his opposition to George Hudson, the ‘Railway King’. In 1849 he was Chairman of York, Newcastle, and Berwick Railway. He promoted mergers which led to the creation of North Eastern Rail (N.E.R.) in 1854, and from 1874 – 1880 he served as Chairman of N.E.R.

However, Leeman was also a successful lawyer and politician. He was Lord Mayor of York three times – 1853-1854, 1860-1861, and 1870-1871. He was also elected as an M.P. for the city in 1865, 1871 and 1874.

As I mentioned last week, these collections will be made gradually available to the public throughout 2015 as we are still busy processing everything.

That’s it for this week. I hope you enjoyed reading a little more about my walk around York. Thank you to everyone who read and/or commented on my post last week. Next week, in the final post in this series, I’ll be talking about one of York’s most well-known artists.

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4 thoughts on “Where Do You Think You Are? A Community Collections Tour of York – Part 2

  1. Another interesting post Georgie. Just one tiny point – the Cosby that Leeman chaired was the North Eastern *Railway* not Rail – the “rail” contraction for a railway company didn’t come into the argot until the 1960s. (And the ghastly “XXX Trains” usage until the 1990s, but I’d better stop there before I get onto my “train station” rant..). Best wishes, Richard

  2. Good afternoon, As a York historian, I am very interested in your articles regarding the people who made York what it is today. I am currently in the process of researching the Judiciary of the city relevant to the Assize circuit prior to 1971 when the system was abolished. Because I am having major difficulties finding individuals who would have sat at these quarterly sessions, I wondered if it would be at all possible to come and see you. This could be helpful to both of us as I would in return help catalogue this subject matter. Many thanks in anticipation. Regards, Iain. A. Simpson-Laing.

  3. born in 1928 in York I remember so many of the  buildings, streets mentioned.Being in Blossom Street was the best I think. Steady traffic of all kinds  from buses, cars, trucks, horses, circus parades, army and other parades. The Salvation Army too Processions of school children from the Convent going to and from the church on holy days dressed in white with a statue under a canopy.Living on a busy road was great, so many  things going on.  People hurrying to and from work We spent our childhood  playing on Knavesmire,  Scarcroft  on the swings;  Going to Rowntrees and St.Georges baths too.  swam like fishes.    I was 11 when the war began and had just started school at Priory St.Higher Grade School.  until shelters were built we went to school, gathered  books and some school work to do and back home.    Once we returned school went on with the odd siren sending us to the shelter.  At night we went off to bed early. Dad made blackout frames ot put in our windows at dusk. Wardens patroled the streets in case you were showing a glimpse of light too./ Many men went off to the forces and women went along alone caring for their kids. As the continent fell, more foreign  servicemen were walking about.    Knavesmire became an internment place for Italian prisoners mostly.  the soon were walking around in their  prison garb, smiling and friendly and no one was worried by them.   Life was as busy as ever for families.  shops opened as always.  Service people walked around or were parading to the station or to Barracks etc. We were not afraid, the only night I was bothered was  that after the siren went,  Dad came in and said the raiders were coming over York now.   we got under the table and could hear the broken sound they made then we heard a whistle and antiaircraft guns going off on the roof of the Odeon I think.    Silence for a few seconds then a crump, silence and then the sound of falling glass and  masonery.    Dad bawled at us to stay where we were, dashed of out..     a short time later he came back to tell us that the Convent just across the road had been bombe and  there was a great hole on the Nunnery Lane side wall./nuns and possibly students killed.     Next day we went over to look at the great hole in the side wall    My brother was photographed looking at the damage, he was around 12 or so I think.Life went on, School, mum and dad working. Clothes and Food rationing.  occured.   We always had plenty to eat,    Vegetables and  fruit grew around our area.    Our garden was  dug and seed and plants put in.   We always ate well,  we had a good butcher and green grocer, baker and sweet shops all nearby.  Our ration books were registered at a local shop which meant we had to go there  for rationed goods.  Our butcher got the meat coupons.     Between Ron Buckle our grocer and bakers  and Arthur Rank our butcher, Almgills for our sweets, we never went without.   Good plain wholesome food.  We had few clothes,   coupons were used for essentials.  people passed their kids stuff around the family  and in return received from others.] Mum and dad gave simple suppers to some wounded French Canadians and they would come and eat and sing round our  old piano.    plus the Firemen likewise took turns to come up. Everyone seemed to help their  friends, neighbours and the service people./ We went to Holy Trinity church in Micklegate when Cannon Lee and his wife were there. lovely services in the old church, twice on sundays, plus sunday school, Girls Friendly society, Young Wives fellowships, Mothers Union, all meetings well attended.   Men and BOys in the choirs.   i think there was a good local community feeling in the City.  We were satisfied with less.   An occasional trip to the cinema, or theatre, Pantomime, the Empire also.The allotments were gardened for vegetables  too.  I had uncles in the Desert Rats, the Air Force and the Pathfinders too.   the Royal and Merchant Navies.   “The Land Army had an aunt of mine in it. Dances at the Coop Hall in Railway St.,   the better ones at the De Grey Rooms,   The Albany also  Church Halls held  quite a few too.     “Girls dressed up the best they could and a lot of young service men went,   many romances sprang  from them also!!!! War is not good, but it brings out the kindness in people too.      

    On Thursday, October 23, 2014 4:55 AM, York: A City Making History wrote:

    #yiv5237749646 a:hover {color:red;}#yiv5237749646 a {text-decoration:none;color:#0088cc;}#yiv5237749646 a.yiv5237749646primaryactionlink:link, #yiv5237749646 a.yiv5237749646primaryactionlink:visited {background-color:#2585B2;color:#fff;}#yiv5237749646 a.yiv5237749646primaryactionlink:hover, #yiv5237749646 a.yiv5237749646primaryactionlink:active {background-color:#11729E;color:#fff;}#yiv5237749646 WordPress.com | georgiemyler posted: “Last week I posted Part 1 of a series of 3 posts about my ‘Community Collections Tour’ of York. I talked about John Goodricke, the Morrell family, and the Gray family, most well known for their role as prominent solicitors. This week, I’ll be looking at a” | |

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