A warm welcome to York Press readers!

Hello and welcome to those of you who have read about the City Making History project in the York Press and come along to find out more. This blog is the story of the cataloguing project, where I talk about what I’m doing, why and how.

If you’d like more background info about the project, the archive collection or the innovative new cataloguing technique  that I am using, please click the links at the top of the page.

Otherwise feel free to dive right in and explore the content! You can start at the beginning and read through chronologically by clicking the months on the left bar (always my favourite way to catch up with a new blog) or you can use the tag cloud to go straight to the topics that interest you.

If you want to find out about being an archivist and what actually happens behind the scenes, then  click on “What archivists do” or if you are more interested in seeing historic records, then click “Lucky Dips” to see archives in lots of detail.

Like what you see? Why not join my regular followers by subscribing by email – then you get each new post (typically once a week) sent direct to you inbox.

Not seen the Press feature yet? Just pick up a local paper or click through to the York Press website. It was very strange to be interviewed and being the one in front of the camera for once, I think I prefer to hide behind my keyboard!

The project is a third of the way through. Five months down, ten to go and please don’t forget to get in touch and let me know your thoughts, questions or ideas via the comments box you’ll find at the bottom of every post.

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11 thoughts on “A warm welcome to York Press readers!

  1. Sounds like an interesting project! We’re just coming to the end of our National Cataloguing Grants- funded project at Wolverhampton archives, so will be good to hear how you get on using such a different method.

  2. I am in my 80s and lived in Blossom Street York at no.20 which was then forselius garage. It had been Horsleys gunsmiths before that. It was knocked down and made into the new garage in the 1930s.
    When the work was in progress and drainage and footings were being dug.an old passage was discovered going out into the road towards the Convent and it was thought to have been part of an old escape tunnel from the Convent after the suppression.
    It was I believe blocked up during the building of the garage.
    Can anyone in York remember the event and let the city authorities know of their memories. it seems it was not recorded but I know it was found and
    the garage owners and people in the building of it might remember.
    I know it caused quite abit of excitement at the time.
    It was probably infilled to stop the traffic causing it to collapse further.

  3. Hello Audrey, thank-you very much for visiting the blog and sharing your comment. It’s possible that there are records about it in the city archive, or in the convent archive, but there are places you can share your story. I suggest that you contact the York Stories 2012 project, which is collecting the unique memories and experiences of people like yourself as part of York 800. They have a website at http://www.yorkstories2012.com, or you can ring them on 01904 554660 and offer to submit your story to be preserved for the future.

    • I do write to York Stories and I wrote to the Convent also some time ago.
      It might be that a press article might raise memories from someone in my age group Im in my 80s
      Living on Blossom Street as a child meant I saw a lot of what went on in York as it usually passed or doors coming or going into the city!!!
      My father worked at Forselius in the 1930s and 1940s hence my knowing about the tunnel. we lived at no.20 before and after its development from the Horsley Gunsmith firm to forselius we lived in the old house above the
      premises, rambling old place with attics, the windows concealed by a front wall as they ofte were. We would climb out onto the roof !!!
      There was a big rear garden that had at one time been quite attractive with a small pond with expensive glazed stone edging. fruit trees too and flower beds. we found a big sunken old tin boat in the mud of th pond.
      there was a big long old shed too. We had a man who gardened part of it fo vegetables in he war. Mr. Hanson I think he was. \
      The building was used by th NFS in the war with the fireengines that went out to fires in the raids. We contiued to live above it. When a raid was due we were brought down to lay on bunks behind my mum who was at the switchboard.

    • thank you, Im 84 and live in virginia usa, been here since 2005 after my husband died, he and I lived in York for many years from childhood.
      I wll continue to wrtie if and as I remember things.
      Here in the USA everything is so big and I dont get far. Not like walking out of your door in Blossom Street straight into the hustle and bussle of city life!!!!
      Happy Christmas to everyone!

  4. I think there was an archaeological excavation of the Blossom St site Audrey mentions, in the 1990s, by York Archaeological Trust, so they perhaps would know if any trace of the tunnel was found then.

    I’m not sure if Audrey has contributed to the city council’s own ‘York Stories 2012’ project but she has sent me memories of York which have been included over the course of this year on the York Stories website (an independent personal website, no connection with the local authority project, despite the similar name). Including http://www.yorkstories.co.uk/news_and_views/index.php/tag/audrey/page/6/ – on the Forsselius garage. The tag should lead to the others, including an interesting page on Kitch’s garage in Clifton. I’ll do my best to preserve these memories for the future. Maybe the city archive can help with that at some point.

    • YORK HAS MANY UNTOLD HISTORIC STORIES. iM SURE THAT PEOPLE COULD COME FORWARD AND TELL US THEM. EACH FAMILY HAS ONE OR TWO AT LEAST.
      if WE DONT RECORD THEM WE LOSE THEM. SO ANYONE WHO REMEMBERS THE 1900S WRITE THEIR STORY DOWN, OR TELL A FAMILY MEMBER.
      THE OLD STREETS, WALMGATE, FOSSGATE, MICKLEGATE, STONEGATE ALL MUST HAVE SOME GHOSTS OR ODD STORIES.
      I CAN GO BACK TO THE 1930S AT EARLIEST BUT REMEMBER MY GRANNIES STORIES TOO.
      SIT DOWN, LOOK BACK, REMEMBER SOMETHING YOUR GRANNY OR GRANDDAD SAID OR DID. MY MUM WAS BORN IN 1904 AND SHE TOLD ME LOTS OF STORIES, MY GRANNIES BOTH IN THE 1800S
      I HAVE IN UK SOME OLD PICTURES, BUT SADLY CANT GET THEM OVER HERE IN THE USA AT PRESENT.
      LOOK BACK, THEN SIT DOWN, WRITE, EVEN A SMALL PIECE CAN REVIVE MEMORIES OF A STREET, OR HOUSE, AN OLD SHOP ETC.
      THE OLDER STREETS ESPECIALLY HAVE VERY OLD PROPERTIES IN. SOME OF THEM HAVE UNTOUCHED UPSTAIRS AND ATTIC ROOMS.
      GO UP HAVE A LOOK, DIG STUFF OUT. YOU MIGHT BE SURPRISED WHAT YOU FIND.

  5. Hello, i believe that i saw you visited my weblog so i came to return the
    prefer?.I’m trying to to find things to enhance my site!I suppose its good enough to
    use some of your ideas!!

    • what of the Play grounds,, parks, aviary in Rowntrees Park, Scarcroft and Shipton rd Swings. the little Memorial garden j near the station hotel
      and the Lendal bridge. The Museum gardens with the squirrels, the students sitting round on the grass.
      the swans on the river near Ouse Bridge.
      The fairs held on the St. GEorges field, colourful and noisy and well
      attended.
      I loved the Market Place when it was in the front of the M & S stores area.
      so many stalls, from fruit and veg. to cloth and eggs and live chicks.
      The hurdy gurdy old couple near the station with their quaky voices.
      begging for money.
      Charlie thorton with his newsopaper sales.
      York had so much back there in the 1930s onward.
      the processions, the marches, the Salvation Army. Servicemen,
      the circus processions to the Knavesmire.
      the vans with icecream for sale. I remember the Capaldi ones.
      Dray Horses with their big Kegs outside the Club on Blossom St.
      Chalrie Greaves a big portly man and his little wife standing outside the Lion and Lamb. well frequented by local people.
      The Windmill Hotel with Mr. Hansell., hia lirrlw daughter on her pony lead by the groom
      I

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